FY2021 Budget

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Thank you for your participation.  The Missoula City Council adopted the FY21 budget on August 31, 2020 with no increase to the City tax rate. 

Mayor John Engen presented his budget recommendations for fiscal year 2021 (FY21) on July 8. You can view his budget recommendations, follow changes requested by the City Council, and comment on budget proposals here.

Budget Highlights

  • General Fund budget will grow by about $1.7 million to honor contracts, handle inflation, and pay our people
  • Mayor Engen will not raise City property taxes for FY21

Revenue

Our primary source of funding for most of our work is property taxes. We make revenue projections based on the information we have when we start our budget process. We won’t know for certain what our revenue will be until the first week of August. The Montana Department of Revenue will release our certified taxable values then. After that, we can see which of our goals we can reach in this budget year.

Budget Goals

The City’s strategic plan outlines guiding principles and specific goals. These principles inform our budget decisions. Mayor Engen presented his priorities to the City Council.

  • Make infrastructure investments, such as transportation, water, parks, and trails through the Community Investment Program
  • Support affordable housing via seed funding for the Missoula Housing Trust Fund
  • Support vulnerable residents through a behavioral-health mobile crisis unit
  • Invest in the “rainy-day” fund
  • Enhance our communication with our residents
  • Invest in sustainability
  • Support additional training, safety equipment, and body-worn video cameras for police

Staying Informed

We have several ways for you to find information about our annual budget. This site will have regular budget updates in the news feed below. In-depth budget documents will be on our main website.

  • Subscribe to this project using the button to the right.
  • Visit this page and read the updates in the news feed.
  • Find detailed documents on our main website.
  • View budget meeting agendas, minutes, and videos on our website.

Getting Involved

You can leave budget comments in several ways. Please note that all comments are public record.

  • Ask us a question in the Q&A below. The question will be posted publicly with your user name.
  • Submit comments via our feedback form. These will be included in the City Council’s meeting information each week.
  • Comment on the agenda. When agendas are posted on the City’s main website, they include a place for the public to submit comments. Sign up to receive the City Council agendas and Committee Schedules.
  • Participate in meetings. Each meeting has a public comment period, and participation instructions are included in the agendas.

Mayor John Engen presented his budget recommendations for fiscal year 2021 (FY21) on July 8. You can view his budget recommendations, follow changes requested by the City Council, and comment on budget proposals here.

Budget Highlights

  • General Fund budget will grow by about $1.7 million to honor contracts, handle inflation, and pay our people
  • Mayor Engen will not raise City property taxes for FY21

Revenue

Our primary source of funding for most of our work is property taxes. We make revenue projections based on the information we have when we start our budget process. We won’t know for certain what our revenue will be until the first week of August. The Montana Department of Revenue will release our certified taxable values then. After that, we can see which of our goals we can reach in this budget year.

Budget Goals

The City’s strategic plan outlines guiding principles and specific goals. These principles inform our budget decisions. Mayor Engen presented his priorities to the City Council.

  • Make infrastructure investments, such as transportation, water, parks, and trails through the Community Investment Program
  • Support affordable housing via seed funding for the Missoula Housing Trust Fund
  • Support vulnerable residents through a behavioral-health mobile crisis unit
  • Invest in the “rainy-day” fund
  • Enhance our communication with our residents
  • Invest in sustainability
  • Support additional training, safety equipment, and body-worn video cameras for police

Staying Informed

We have several ways for you to find information about our annual budget. This site will have regular budget updates in the news feed below. In-depth budget documents will be on our main website.

  • Subscribe to this project using the button to the right.
  • Visit this page and read the updates in the news feed.
  • Find detailed documents on our main website.
  • View budget meeting agendas, minutes, and videos on our website.

Getting Involved

You can leave budget comments in several ways. Please note that all comments are public record.

  • Ask us a question in the Q&A below. The question will be posted publicly with your user name.
  • Submit comments via our feedback form. These will be included in the City Council’s meeting information each week.
  • Comment on the agenda. When agendas are posted on the City’s main website, they include a place for the public to submit comments. Sign up to receive the City Council agendas and Committee Schedules.
  • Participate in meetings. Each meeting has a public comment period, and participation instructions are included in the agendas.

Thank you for your participation.  The Missoula City Council adopted the FY21 budget on August 31, 2020 with no increase to the City tax rate. 

Feel free to ask any questions about the City's budget process, expenditures, or revenues.  Questions and answers will be visible to the public and will display your screen name.

  • Share Please explain the HR departments $214,000.00 for “safety” what does this consist of? on Facebook Share Please explain the HR departments $214,000.00 for “safety” what does this consist of? on Twitter Share Please explain the HR departments $214,000.00 for “safety” what does this consist of? on Linkedin Email Please explain the HR departments $214,000.00 for “safety” what does this consist of? link

    Please explain the HR departments $214,000.00 for “safety” what does this consist of?

    Matts Larson asked almost 4 years ago

    This request includes staffing for the main City Hall entrance to monitor and direct the public, additional cleaning during the COVID-19 pandemic, an emergency notification system to reach City employees, safety training and tracking software, and the development of security plans for City buildings.  You can see more details on the new request form.  

  • Share Why does the parks department need a new $70,000.00 Miniature electric truck? What employees will be using this truck? How many trucks and Full time employees Does the parks department have? on Facebook Share Why does the parks department need a new $70,000.00 Miniature electric truck? What employees will be using this truck? How many trucks and Full time employees Does the parks department have? on Twitter Share Why does the parks department need a new $70,000.00 Miniature electric truck? What employees will be using this truck? How many trucks and Full time employees Does the parks department have? on Linkedin Email Why does the parks department need a new $70,000.00 Miniature electric truck? What employees will be using this truck? How many trucks and Full time employees Does the parks department have? link

    Why does the parks department need a new $70,000.00 Miniature electric truck? What employees will be using this truck? How many trucks and Full time employees Does the parks department have?

    Matts Larson asked almost 4 years ago

    The Parks and Recreation department is requesting two electric trucks for $36,250 each.  Parks works in tight spaces where smaller vehicles are easier to maneuver.  Electric vehicles, with their lower fuel consumption and reduced greenhouse gas emissions, help us meet our energy conservation and climate action goals.  Parks currently has about 109 full-time equivalent employees and 55 trucks.

  • Share What is the mayor’s office’s new request for $50,000.00 for “communications and seevy studies” Please elaborate. Also would this survey format the city has changed the “comments” section on count as a “survey study”? on Facebook Share What is the mayor’s office’s new request for $50,000.00 for “communications and seevy studies” Please elaborate. Also would this survey format the city has changed the “comments” section on count as a “survey study”? on Twitter Share What is the mayor’s office’s new request for $50,000.00 for “communications and seevy studies” Please elaborate. Also would this survey format the city has changed the “comments” section on count as a “survey study”? on Linkedin Email What is the mayor’s office’s new request for $50,000.00 for “communications and seevy studies” Please elaborate. Also would this survey format the city has changed the “comments” section on count as a “survey study”? link

    What is the mayor’s office’s new request for $50,000.00 for “communications and seevy studies” Please elaborate. Also would this survey format the city has changed the “comments” section on count as a “survey study”?

    Matts Larson asked almost 4 years ago

    The Mayor’s Office survey request is for a scientific survey conducted with randomly selected residents.  Surveys on Engage Missoula and other public feedback tools are useful, but a scientific survey of randomly selected Missoulians gives us a snapshot of the community as a whole.  Our 2018 survey contained useful feedback from our residents and it will be helpful to see how opinions have changed over time.  Survey results are one way for us to measure progress toward our goals and set priorities.   

    The other component of this request is communication services.  We often have to communicate complex issues in a public-friendly format.  Some projects can benefit from professional designers or communications firms who can help us increase public engagement.


  • Share I would like to understand why the request for riot helmets custom molded to each of our 113 police are classified in police dept new Requests as “PPE”? Couldn’t this request be construed as offensive to nurses and medical professionals who are currently experiencing a shortage of real covid 19 PPE face masks in this community? on Facebook Share I would like to understand why the request for riot helmets custom molded to each of our 113 police are classified in police dept new Requests as “PPE”? Couldn’t this request be construed as offensive to nurses and medical professionals who are currently experiencing a shortage of real covid 19 PPE face masks in this community? on Twitter Share I would like to understand why the request for riot helmets custom molded to each of our 113 police are classified in police dept new Requests as “PPE”? Couldn’t this request be construed as offensive to nurses and medical professionals who are currently experiencing a shortage of real covid 19 PPE face masks in this community? on Linkedin Email I would like to understand why the request for riot helmets custom molded to each of our 113 police are classified in police dept new Requests as “PPE”? Couldn’t this request be construed as offensive to nurses and medical professionals who are currently experiencing a shortage of real covid 19 PPE face masks in this community? link

    I would like to understand why the request for riot helmets custom molded to each of our 113 police are classified in police dept new Requests as “PPE”? Couldn’t this request be construed as offensive to nurses and medical professionals who are currently experiencing a shortage of real covid 19 PPE face masks in this community?

    Matts Larson asked almost 4 years ago

    During the pandemic, many people are hearing the acronym PPE (personal protective equipment) for the first time.  PPE is a broad term that includes any protective equipment workers need while on the job.  For health care workers, PPE means gloves, gowns, surgical masks, and similar equipment to prevent the spread of disease.  PPE also means hard hats for people working in a construction zone, reflective safety vests for street maintenance staff working near traffic, and helmets for police officers dispatched to incidents involving the use or threatened use of a firearm.

  • Share How do we justify increasing our budget when everyone is facing financial pressures from covid. What are we doing to seriously try to hold spending flat? What method of problem solving are we using? on Facebook Share How do we justify increasing our budget when everyone is facing financial pressures from covid. What are we doing to seriously try to hold spending flat? What method of problem solving are we using? on Twitter Share How do we justify increasing our budget when everyone is facing financial pressures from covid. What are we doing to seriously try to hold spending flat? What method of problem solving are we using? on Linkedin Email How do we justify increasing our budget when everyone is facing financial pressures from covid. What are we doing to seriously try to hold spending flat? What method of problem solving are we using? link

    How do we justify increasing our budget when everyone is facing financial pressures from covid. What are we doing to seriously try to hold spending flat? What method of problem solving are we using?

    Lynn asked almost 4 years ago

    Mayor Engen will not increase City property taxes for fiscal year 2021.  Every year, we work to make sure Missoula’s budget reflects the priorities and expectations of our residents as outlined in our strategic plan.  We balance those expectations with available revenue.  You can read more about our funding priorities in Mayor Engen’s budget letter.

    We received our revenue numbers from the State of Montana Department of Revenue on August 3.  City administration will present that information to the Budget Committee of the Whole on August 26.  Agendas and participation instructions for that meeting will be available one to two days before the meeting on our main website.  We anticipate that the increased revenue will be sufficient to cover our required budget needs.


  • Share I would like to understand what $226, 332 in the Police budget for "Core and enhanced training for officers to maintain level of service" means specifically. on Facebook Share I would like to understand what $226, 332 in the Police budget for "Core and enhanced training for officers to maintain level of service" means specifically. on Twitter Share I would like to understand what $226, 332 in the Police budget for "Core and enhanced training for officers to maintain level of service" means specifically. on Linkedin Email I would like to understand what $226, 332 in the Police budget for "Core and enhanced training for officers to maintain level of service" means specifically. link

    I would like to understand what $226, 332 in the Police budget for "Core and enhanced training for officers to maintain level of service" means specifically.

    jennifere asked almost 4 years ago

    This request includes training on implicit bias, de-escalation, use of force, and defensive tactics training for all officers.  It also includes training specifically for patrol officers and detectives.  We also intend to upgrade our Force Option Simulator, which we use for training on de-escalation, crisis intervention, and use of force.  Finally, we need to ensure that our staffing levels are sufficient to meet community needs while officers are in training.  To that end, we include overtime in the request, as well.   You can find additional details in the Police Department presentation or you can watch the committee meeting for the full discussion.

    Mayor Engen discusses his support of this increased training in his introductory letter.  “We know this: a better-educated police officer is a more effective police officer. Chief White brings considerable experience to bear in leading the Missoula Police Department and in his review of our department, he immediately recognized that our training, across the board, was inadequate. You’ll see that addressed in this budget, with continuing education and advanced training for all officers. You’ll also note an emphasis on bias and de-escalation, two of the critical concerns of the community.

    In addition, you’ll note that we’re expanding our training in crisis intervention, because until there’s a federal or state solution to helping folks in crisis, even with our mobile-crisis team, Missoula police officers will continue to serve in that vital role, meeting people in crisis where they are, stabilizing the situation and connecting those in crisis with appropriate services. As we continue to invest in alternative responses, there may come a day when an officer isn’t the first responder to a behavioral-health crisis, but that’s not going to happen overnight, so I want officers who are well-trained to help people in crisis 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year.”